Some of the usual thrills have modified formats, but there’s still plenty to enjoy as New York electrifies with those auburn-and-ruby hues of turning leaves. From artisan markets to glowing pumpkin patches, squash this list of real-life and virtual experiences to make the most of fall across New York City, the East End, and the Hudson Valley.


NEW YORK CITY 

Brooklyn Grange, hidden atop one of the old Bush Terminal warehouses in Sunset Park.

Farm-to-table marvel Blue Hill is ferrying farm-to-picnic basket bundles for pickup at the restaurant’s Greenwich Village outpost, conveniently just half a block from Washington Square Park. (They’re also offering exclusive private picnics, at Stone Barns in Westchester, for parties of 2-8).

For a trip to the farm without leaving city limits, Brooklyn Grange is opening their rooftop agricultural havens in Sunset Park and Long Island City for a series of seasonal markets, currently scheduled through November 1st.

On October 20th, New York’s esteemed chefs and mixologists come together to host City Harvest’s annual autumn dinner. This year’s guests will have the Michelin-caliber feast arrive at their doorstep, with streamed programming to round out the at-home experience.

The New York Botanical Garden is officially back open with safety protocols in place, but if you aren’t up for the subway ride to the Bronx they’re offering virtual strolls to gawk the foliage.

The state’s small-but-mighty craft cider community unites November 6th-15th for Cider Week New York City, pairing a series of socially-distanced events throughout the boroughs with virtual orchard visits.


THE HAMPTONS/NORTH FORK

Reservations aren’t required to pick-your-own at Harbes on the North Fork, which is open at reduced capacity — arrive early if you want those obligatory cider donuts.

Harbes Farm is back open in Mattituck for pick-your-own pumpkins — along with apples, at their orchard down the road in Northville. Reservations aren’t required, but they’ll be operating at limited capacity — plan accordingly.

Scout for spooks at Southampton’s History Museum when it turns the Gilded Age mansion into a paranormal investigation site for guests each weekend in October.

If sampling in Sagaponack amidst the just-harvested vines just isn’t an option, Wölffer Estate’s “Back to Fall” virtual tasting packages are the perfect way to enjoy the East End’s choice nectar wherever you are.

Leaf Pile, the North Fork’s favorite pumpkin ale, is back at Greenport Harbor Brewing. Snag a curbside can drop, or enjoy on-site at the spacious Peconic brewery.

Amagansett’s Amber Waves Farm will host an al fresco Full Moon Supper on October 2nd, complete with wine pairings, hors d’oeuvres in the herb garden, and a farmer-led tour to celebrate the season’s bounty.

Riverhead’s Garden of Eve Farm has transformed into an autumnal oasis for all ages, with an organic U-Pick pumpkin patch and on-farm brewery with a tap wall of seasonal indulgences on the menu.


WESTCHESTER/HUDSON VALLEY

Shop Field + Supply’s haute homewares online this year, with curated wish lists by top designers and lifestyle mavens like Eyeswoon’s Athena Calderone.

Kingston’s Field + Supply is a ritual for tastemakers, but this year, the makers are going virtual. An online market is scheduled for October 8th-12th — expect the usual array of ceramics, lavish linens, and other curated homewares, paired with live sessions and Spotify playlists to get in the mood.

You won’t find the usual apple-picking crowds this year, but the DIY harvesting tradition lives on by reservation at North Salem’s Harvest Moon and Outhouse Orchards — others in the Mid-Hudson region, like Fishkill Farms, are following suit.

Artfully-sculpted pumpkins will again glow before Van Cortlandt Manor, in Croton-on-Hudson, for the Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze, where visitors can gawk at gourds through November. (A second outpost for the event debuts this year at Long Island’s Old Bethpage Village).

What better way to welcome All Hallow’s than a visit to the forefather of literary horror’s estate? Washington Irving’s Sunnyside, in Tarrytown, is welcoming ticketed guests, on select dates, for ghoulish scavenger hunts, with a clear COVID Courtesy Code.

While not open for picking this year, Ulster County’s Westwind Orchard is still welcoming outdoor-seated visitors to enjoy its Nonna-supervised wood pizza program, slinging seasonably topped pies with farm-grown ingredients.